How To Vary Your Reading List (& Why It’s Important)

The skies are crisp and white today, speckled by graphite patches. Rain bubbles by the horizon. I expect it to arrive later that day, or dissolve into a drier spell, as far as that’s possible in Southern England. Occasionally, a few sun rays fall through the clouds, streaking the ground with a honeyed gold. Through a gap in my window, an invigorating, yet soothing breeze enters my room and uplifts a few pages of the book I’m reading diligently at my desk.

This interaction between wind and paper reminds me of how there’s a timelessness to reading. Civilisations come and go; zeitgeists and cultures change to become something unrecognisable. But a distinct current carries our love for telling and reading stories through the decades. And all writing is, fundamentally, a story, either told explicitly through a work of fiction, or implied in arguments in an academic journal. Even the advertising on the mail truck which falters outside my house and attempts a clumsy turnaround connotes a certain immediacy in its colours and logo: it is attentive to the efficiency of communication our world demands.

Few people can experience life in its full emotional, practical and intellectual dimension without a strong reading habit. Through reading, we can acquire specialised and applicable knowledge on topics of interest to us, whether history or personal development or mathematics. Words capture certain truths about the world, building our wisdom and emotional intelligence. We develop a more nuanced and diverse outlook on the human experience with all its complexities. And regardless of the extent to which film and other forms of entertainment grow in popularity, both for better and for worse, regardless of how digitised our lives become, I believe reading will retain a central place in our culture because language – musical, with infinite dimensions of expression – can’t be supplanted or erased.

As well as making reading an intrinsic part of our daily schedule, we should expand the type of material we read. Sure, you might have a specific genre or subject matter which aligns with your life and interests more than others. This may be a general preference, like reading fiction as opposed to nonfiction, or writing relevant to your pursuits, such as reading history books as a history student, business self-help as a business owner, etc.

Why You Should Branch Out Your Reading List, And How To Go About Doing It

But what are some of the benefits of branching out what you read?

  1. An expanded world view. Put simply, you’ll know more about the world, strengthening your arguments and perspectives on topical debates. By understanding how the world works, we can give rise to more intelligent conversation, which in turn engenders tangible change both in our local communities and on a bigger scale. Sure, we can’t become experts in absolutely everything from history and philosophy to maths and environmental developments, but expanding our general knowledge in a variety of areas allows us to engage fully with contemporary discourse.
  2. Multidimensional thinking. You can apply ideas from a variety of sources to the problems you face, whether in education, the workplace, or day-to-day life. For example, plucking ideas from philosophy can help you self-evaluate and tackle hurdles like procrastination and comparison. Reading fiction streamlines your writing skills, regardless of what the purpose of your own writing may be.
  3. Enhanced creativity. Reading something new is often a foolproof way to channel creativity and develop ideas when hindered by problems such as writer’s block. You can carry ideas between disciplines and combine them in unexpected ways, exploring issues from a novel perspective. In short, you’ll establish an ‘inner library’ from which to draw information and insights when the need arises.
  4. Curiosity! Knowing for the sake of knowing is a worthwhile endeavour. We should nurture our curiosity inside and outside formal education, making learning a lifelong goal. The best way to do this is through reading, and the more you diversity your reading list, the further you will acquaint yourself with an array of fascinating topics.
  5. Intellectual development. New material is likely to be challenging and out of your comfort zone, making you think in different ways. Broader intellectual development will arise out of this, equipping you with the mental skills that can be applied across multiple areas of life.

Even with a single purpose in life, surrounded by micro-objectives, reading widely makes us far more knowledgeable and involved in the world as individuals, while strengthening us in what we do because knowledge has a fluid quality. Not constrained to a particular subject or circumstances, but capable of being decontextualised and applied to anything from a mundane problem to one of existential proportions. View Full Post